Green voltammetry – a new generation of sensors for mercury-free analysis of heavy metals

RECORD | Already taken place Th, 2.11.2023
How you can perform «green voltammetry» in the laboratory as well as in the field for fast determination and speciation of heavy metals ranging from arsenic to zinc.
Metrohm: Green voltammetry – a new generation of sensors for mercury-free analysis of heavy metals

Metrohm: Green voltammetry – a new generation of sensors for mercury-free analysis of heavy metals

From applied research to corrosion monitoring to quality control of boiler feed water in the power industry – voltammetry is an established method for highly selective and sensitive analysis of heavy metals. Now, a new generation of mercury-free sensors developed by Metrohm makes this method «green» and hence compatible with increasingly tougher environmental regulations in many countries.

Join Jakub Tymoczko, Application Specialist at Metrohm International Headquarters, in his webinar on November 2 and learn how how you can perform «green voltammetry» in the laboratory as well as in the field for fast determination and speciation of heavy metals ranging from arsenic to zinc.

Key learnings of this webinar:

  • The principle behind the new generation of mercury-free sensors from Metrohm
  • The inherent benefits of voltammetry for heavy metal analysis such as lower costs, easier to use, faster results than by competing methods, e.g., ICP-MS
  • Typical application examples from different fields (research, process control, monitoring of drinking water)
  • Automation possibilities for high throughput analysis of large sample series

Presenter: Jakub Tymoczko (Application Specialist Voltammetry, Metrohm International Headquarters)

Dr. Jakub Tymoczko has worked for the Competence Center Voltammetry at Metrohm International Headquarters in Switzerland since 2015. In this time, he has been in charge of developing Metrohm's new generation of mercury-free sensors and methods for heavy metal detection. Jakub has a Master in biochemistry and received his PhD in electrochemistry on the engineering of model electrocatalysts for energy conversion and storage from the Ruhr-University in Bochum.

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